Object Oriented Learning

Posted by aimeemcgrenera on April 18, 2017

As I near the end of Object Oriented Ruby in the Learn curriculum, I am starting to feel a huge sense of accomplishment. In the beginning of this section, I found myself experiencing the dreaded “Imposter Syndrome”. Something I had never heard of before entering the coding world, but have certainly experienced previously in my life.

Working a full time job has undeniably added to the stress of commitment to this program. Whenever I wasn’t working on my lessons and labs I would feel guilty. And even though this program is individually paced, I constantly felt like I was behind. I started to worry that I was going through the labs and lessons without actually gaining the knowledge. I was trying to cram as much in as I could whenever I had the free time. I began questioning if after this whole program is done and said for, will I be able to apply this to real life experiences?

About midway through Object Relationships it all started clicking. The curriculum feeds on top of the previous lesson and labs, and without realizing it, I was already using what I learned previously in order to solve the next step. You truly needed to understand the previous lessons in order to accomplish the new ones.

What I love about Object Oriented Ruby is how literal it is. In Ruby EVERYTHING is an object. A Class is used as the “blueprint” of an Object. Once you retain the difference between Classes, Instances and Objects it’s really about manipulating your Class and Instances with Methods and Data to obtain your desired goal and output of that object. Individual objects will contain different information from other objects, yet they are instances of the same class. Classes can inherit from SuperClasses or Parent classes, and modules are used to group classes together. Easy right? Trust me, at first this all seemed like gibberish to me. Being a visual learner, what really helped me understand the flow and hierarchy of it all was doing more research, reading and googling. I found webs and flowcharts online which helped me understand it in a physical or “object” sense :) I thought I would share with all of you.

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